The DFL is a media production center focused on getting students engaged in digital media, and helping them hone their design skills. Students are encouraged to develop their own projects, as well as given chances to work with industry professionals.
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"… Gone Home knows exactly what it is: story wrapped in an interactive environment. The mechanics of the game are all designed to enhance that narrative experience, rather than compromising it with unnecessary, artificial gamification. A narrative like this doesn’t need any added difficulty; I was sobbing hard enough without having to solve a minigame too, thanks.”

Read the Next’s full review of Gone Home.


Meet A Writer of Some Little Infamy as the Digital Future Lab interviews Jonathan L. Howard! Mr. Howard was kind enough to discuss his experiences writing for prose fiction, video games, and talks a little about the future of those industries.
Read the full interview HERE

Meet A Writer of Some Little Infamy as the Digital Future Lab interviews Jonathan L. Howard! Mr. Howard was kind enough to discuss his experiences writing for prose fiction, video games, and talks a little about the future of those industries.

Read the full interview HERE

With this many explosions, innovations, and awesome female leads dominating in the indie sector, who needs AAA games?

Check out our roundup of the Top 10 Indie Games at PAX Prime 2013!

There is no good ending, and it’s entirely reflective of the world that has been set up throughout the entire experience. Everything is exciting, frightening, and somber at the same time. The world is bleak, but The Last of Us has instilled in me that if the world ever does go to hell, it’s much better to spend it with a stranger than to spend it by yourself.

[Read our full and un-spoilery review: 100% More Feels: Looking into The Last of Us]


On an average day at the Digital Future Lab you’ll hear our interns discussing how best to punish those who fail to write and screaming into their iPads to make Vines, with the occasional dissolution into frenetic cackling. More recently, we’ve augmented our soundscape with frantic keyboard mashing, cheers of success, and the endless screams of the dying. We have been playing the the fan-made game for the popular series Attack on Titan, and you should too.
[See our full review: You Should Play: Feng’s Attack on Titan Fangame]

On an average day at the Digital Future Lab you’ll hear our interns discussing how best to punish those who fail to write and screaming into their iPads to make Vines, with the occasional dissolution into frenetic cackling. More recently, we’ve augmented our soundscape with frantic keyboard mashing, cheers of success, and the endless screams of the dying. We have been playing the the fan-made game for the popular series Attack on Titan, and you should too.

[See our full review: You Should Play: Feng’s Attack on Titan Fangame]

gh3ttobla5ter:

Vintage photos of women getting tattoos by the tebori method.

(via vorpalplatypus)

alexriesart:

To see how I painted this creature, head over to Pheonix Atelier and sign up! I shall be instructing a class there from the 21st of October in creature design.

http://www.phoenixatelier.com/program/designing-alien-life#.UlQpdhB6pu4

The Kirrabilli

The kirrabilli are a sentient hexapodal species about four and a half feet high, living on a small, warm world orbiting a slow burning star.

Although now technologically advanced, the kirrabilli evolved as environmental specialists who hunted for both animal and plant food across the extensive moss-like forest floors of their subtropical home. This soft sponge-like substrate played a key role in the evolution of the kirrabilli and their unusual needle like feet: The thin tips, unable to support themselves on the moss, sink into it several inches and are stopped from slipping deeper by a ring of tough, fibrous hairs. This provides some extra traction, but more importantly allows the thin and highly sensitive tips to detect vibrations passing through the denser ground beneath. By sensing the substrate in this way the kirrabilli can detect large creatures moving a considerable distance away while also communicating with one another via rhythmic vibrations through the ground.  As their evolution progressed towards more complex intelligence, entire long range conversations could be carried on this way and thus the groundwork was laid for co-operative hunting and intertribal communication.

Whilst their stable environment made thermoregulation largely unnecessary, the kirrabilli are able to maintain an elevated body temperature when necessary by concentrating warm blood near the central organs and withdrawing it from the long slender limbs. Weather falling outside of their range of tolerance was met by moss matt shelters and communal huddling until the discovery of fire and limited clothing.

Sensory input comes from several highly specialised organs and is dominated by sight. Two stalked and densely packed compound eyes extend from the front of the head, below which hang sensitive olfactory organs to detect scents and changes in humidity. In keeping with their well-developed vibration detection abilities, their hearing is acute and is mediated through mobile ears at the tip of the abdomen.

As omnivores, the kirrabilli possess mouthparts and manipulators of a generalised and adaptable design. The arms, derived from the lips, lack a solid skeleton and collect fruits or carry weapons for subduing small prey. Equipped with their own basic sense of taste, these arms pass food up the mouth that lies between them.

Their most critical adaptation, however, may be their linguistic abilities which encompass visual, aural and infrasonic components. Various configurations of the limbs and body reveal the colourful blue patches on the legs and abdomen, the different combinations conveying meaning and intent. Sound is generated through a combination of stridulation using the rough inner surfaces of the arms, and air expelled and modulated through the twin breathing spiracles on either side of the abdomen. Dramatic punctuation and long range communication can be supplemented by beating on the substrate.

Currently a technologically advanced and relatively peaceful people, the kirrabilli have developed sustainable high density agriculture and their population continues to grow.

(via persisting)

digitalfuturelab:

Our very own Simone De Rochefort recently held an interview with Alexis Kennedy, creator of Fallen London!


As you might know from reading my reviews of Fallen London and Machine Cares, I’m a huge fan of Failbetter Games and the way they incorporate narrative into games. This past year saw the exciting announcement that Failbetter is creating their first PC game: Sunless Sea, which just achieved full funding on Kickstarter. I contacted Failbetter Chief Narrative Officer Alexis Kennedy with all the timidness of a field mouse to ask him some questions about his work. The timidness was not called for; Mr. Kennedy was friendly, awesome, and totally willing to talk about his work.

Read the whole interview here

Our very own Simone De Rochefort recently held an interview with Alexis Kennedy, creator of Fallen London!


As you might know from reading my reviews of Fallen London and Machine Cares, I’m a huge fan of Failbetter Games and the way they incorporate narrative into games. This past year saw the exciting announcement that Failbetter is creating their first PC game: Sunless Sea, which just achieved full funding on Kickstarter. I contacted Failbetter Chief Narrative Officer Alexis Kennedy with all the timidness of a field mouse to ask him some questions about his work. The timidness was not called for; Mr. Kennedy was friendly, awesome, and totally willing to talk about his work.

Read the whole interview here